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Kevin Durant NBA

Kevin Durant, in full Kevin Wayne Durant, (conceived September 29, 1988, Washington, D.C., U.S.), American professional basketball player who won the 2013–14 National Basketball Association (NBA) Most Valuable Player (MVP) grant and built up himself as a standout amongst the best players of his age while just in his early 20s. 

Durant was a basketball wonder as an adolescent, getting to be a standout amongst the best prospects in the flourishing Washington, D.C.- region basketball scene by his early years in secondary school and an All-American in his senior season. He went to the University of Texas, where as a first year recruit he drove the Big 12 Conference in scoring normal (25.8 focuses per game), bouncing back normal (11.1 bounce back per game), and blocked shots (67). He was additionally a first-group All-American and the main rookie to procure agreement national College Player of the Year praises. He chose to end his college career after only one season and was chosen by the Seattle SuperSonics with the second in general pick of the 2007 NBA draft. 



Durant was the solitary splendid spot in Seattle during his new kid on the block battle, as the group's new proprietors requested a freely subsidized field that the city would not fund, and the group's risk to migrate to another city warded off fans in large numbers. Durant found the middle value of 20.3 focuses per game that season and was the runaway victor of the NBA Rookie of the Year grant. His dynamic play couldn't mend the fracture between the group and the city, notwithstanding, and at season's end the Sonics moved to Oklahoma City and turned into the Thunder. The movement had no observable impact on Durant as he expanded his scoring, bouncing back, helps, and takes midpoints in his second season. He started a dash of five straight All-Star Game appearances and first-group All-NBA praises during the 2009–10 season, when he likewise drove the Thunder to the establishment's first play-off appearance in its new home. In 2011–12 the Thunder—behind Durant's 28.5 focuses per game in the postseason—progressed to the NBA finals, where the group lost to the Miami Heat in a five-game arrangement. 

The 6-foot 9-inch (2.06-meter) forward demonstrated to be an undeniably troublesome matchup as he sharpened his outside game—Durant could shoot over or keep running past trudging post protectors and overshadow littler watchmen. Starting with the 2009–10 season, the dynamic Durant drove the NBA in all out focuses for five straight seasons and in scoring normal multiple times (he completed second in 2012–13). In his predominant 2013–14 MVP season, he set career highs of 32 and 5.5 helps for each game (alongside 7.4 bounce back per challenge). The accompanying season saw Durant play in only 27 recreations in light of a crack in his correct foot and a disturbed recuperation process. He came back to shape in 2015–16, averaging 28.2 focuses per game and a career-high 8.2 bounce back per challenge that season. In the play-offs, Durant drove the Thunder to a 3–1 arrangement lead in the gathering finals over the Golden State Warriors, who had set a NBA record during the ordinary season by storing up 73 triumphs, yet Oklahoma City eventually lost the arrangement in seven amusements. During the accompanying off-season, Durant stunned the NBA by leaving the Thunder in free organization to sign with the Warriors. 

Notwithstanding playing on the most ability loaded group of his career, Durant kept on flourishing with the Warriors, scoring 25.1 focuses per game while helping Golden State post the most successes in the league (67). The Warriors then set a NBA record by opening the postseason with 12 straight triumphs on the way to a Western Conference title. The group's predominance proceeded in the NBA finals, as the Warriors lost only one game to the Cleveland Cavaliers in transit to catching the league title. Durant arrived at the midpoint of 35.2 focuses per game in the finals and was named finals MVP for his exhibition. Durant arrived at the midpoint of 26.4 focuses and a career-high 1.8 squares per game during the 2017–18 ordinary season. He by and by exceeded expectations in the play-offs, driving the Warriors to another NBA title with a compass of the Cavaliers. His outstanding play in the finals—he arrived at the midpoint of 28.7 focuses per game—earned Durant his second finals MVP grant. 

Notwithstanding his professional adventures, Durant was an individual from the U.S. men's national basketball crew that caught a gold award at the 2016 Rio de Janeiro Olympic Games.