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NFL New York Giants

New York Giants, American professional turf football crew situated in East Rutherford, New Jersey. The Giants have won four National Football League (NFL) titles (1927, 1934, 1938, and 1956) and four Super Bowls (1987, 1991, 2008, and 2012). The Giants were noted for their initial triumphs and for their overwhelming play during the 1980s and '90s under head mentor Bill Parcells. 

 



The Giants were built up in 1925 in New York and played their initial three decades at the Polo Grounds in upper Manhattan. The establishment was obtained for $500 by Tim Mara, whose family held a proprietorship enthusiasm for the group into the 21st century (in 1930 he split possession between his two children, Jack and Wellington). In spite of the fact that the Giants lost their first challenge 14–0 to the Frankford Yellow Jackets, they immediately separated themselves as one of the incredible groups of early professional football, winning NFL titles in 1927, 1934, and 1938. The Giants won the 1934 title 30–13 over the Washington Redskins in the well known "Tennis shoes Game"; the Giants trailed at halftime yet changed to basketball shoes to increase better footing on the frosty field. During the following decade the Giants kept on appreciating achievement, progressing to (however losing) four NFL title recreations (1939, 1941, 1944, and 1946). In the late 1940s the group suffered hardship on the field, posting back to back losing seasons in 1947, 1948, and 1949 preceding getting a charge out of accomplishment again during the 1950s. 

 

In 1956 the Giants moved from the Polo Grounds to Yankee Stadium and, behind the legs of amazing running back Frank Gifford and the coarseness of linebacker Sam Huff, caught their fourth (and last) NFL title. During this period the group included protective back Emlen Tunnell, who played 11 seasons (1948–58) and turned into the main African American player to be revered in the Pro Football Hall of Fame. The 1950s group was likewise striking for its training staff, with Vince Lombardi accountable for the offense and Tom Landry the safeguard. The two mentors proceeded to be legends of the Green Bay Packers and Dallas Cowboys, separately. The 1958 NFL title set the Giants against the Baltimore Colts, in what was seen by numerous individuals as one of football's most noteworthy diversions. With a national TV group of spectators viewing, the Colts beat the Giants 23–17 of every a sensational challenge that finished in unexpected passing extra time. The game denoted the start of the NFL's colossal prominence in the United States. 

 

The Giants, driven by quarterback Y.A. Tittle, progressed to the NFL title game in 1961, 1962, and 1963 however then battled for some, seasons, posting just two winning records somewhere in the range of 1964 and 1980 (1970 and 1972). In that period the group additionally moved from New York to New Jersey, starting play at Giants Stadium in the Meadowlands in 1976 (the group played seasons in the Yale Bowl in Connecticut and Shea Stadium in Queens, New York). During this stretch the Giants endured a standout amongst their most stinging thrashings in what was known as the "Wonder at the Meadowlands" or "The Fumble"; on November 19, 1978, against the Philadelphia Eagles, the Giants drove 17–12 and required distinctly to run out the clock to verify triumph, however an errant handoff from quarterback Joe Pisarcik to fullback Larry Csonka enabled the Eagles' Herman Edwards to recoup a bobble and run 26 yards into the end zone to win. 

 

Bill Parcells turned into the Giants' head mentor in the 1983 season. Parcells collected groups that included linebackers Lawrence Taylor and Harry Carson, quarterback Phil Simms, and tight end Mark Bavaro. The Giants won Super Bowls following the 1986 and 1990 seasons, keeping up progress through most of Parcells' residency. Subsequent to catching a moment Super Bowl, Parcells left the group, and a while later the Giants had a blended record, with four winning seasons somewhere in the range of 1991 and 2000. In 2000 they progressed to the Super Bowl, losing 34–7 to the Baltimore Ravens. 

 

In 2004 Tom Coughlin joined the establishment as its head mentor, and, however he in some cases experienced analysis for his style, the Giants performed well under his initiative. In Super Bowl XLII in 2008, driven by quarterback Eli Manning and protective lineman Michael Strahan, the Giants oversaw one of the best miracles in NFL history, vanquishing the beforehand undefeated and vigorously supported New England Patriots. Following a two-year play-off dry season, the Giants again achieved the Super Bowl following the 2011 season and crushed the Patriots 21–17. The group posted unremarkable records the accompanying four years, missing the play-offs each season, which brought about Coughlin's going separate ways with the establishment following the 2015 crusade. An improved safeguard prompted the Giants' posting a 11–5 record in 2016, and the group equipped for the play-offs, where New York lost its opening game. It was a fleeting improvement, in any case, as the Giants continued various huge wounds in 2017, which helped result in the group posting the second most exceedingly awful record in the NFL (3–13) that season.