IMG-LOGO
Home Hockey NHL Toronto Maple Leafs

NHL Toronto Maple Leafs

Toronto Maple Leafs, Canadian expert ice hockey group situated in Toronto that plays in the Eastern Conference of the National Hockey League (NHL). The Maple Leafs have a standout amongst hockey's most-storied pasts, having won the Stanley Cup multiple times. 

 



The Maple Leafs were one of the NHL's establishing groups in 1917 and were first known as the Toronto Arenas before taking on the name St. Patricks in 1919. The group won two Stanley Cups in the NHL's initial five years (in the 1917–18 and 1921–22 seasons). In 1927 the group was acquired by Conn Smythe and renamed the Maple Leafs (regularly abbreviated to "the Leafs" by fans and media). Toronto won the Stanley Cup in the 1931–32 season behind the "Child Line," which highlighted three future Hockey Hall of Fame individuals—Charlie Conacher, Busher Jackson, and Joe Primeau—all under age 26. 

 

Between 1932–33 and 1939–40 the Leafs showed up in six Stanley Cup finals however lost each time. The group got through and caught a title in 1941–42, which was the first of five titles under mentor Hap Day, who had recently featured in the group for 13 seasons. In 1942 Toronto included focus Ted Kennedy, who drove the group to the last four of Day's titles just as another in 1950–51. A remade Maple Leafs group driven by head mentor Punch Imlach and stuffed with future Hall of Famers (conservative and focus George Armstrong, goaltender Johnny Bower, focus Red Kelly, focus Dave Keon, defenseman Tim Horton, left wing Frank Mahovlich, left wing Bob Pulford, and defenseman Allan Stanley) won three Stanley Cups in succession from 1961–62 to 1963–64 and one more during the 1966–67 season. 

 

During the 1970s the Leafs managed their first drawn out episode of uselessness, as that decade was the first where the group neglected to catch a title, regardless of the All-Star play of focus Darryl Sittler and defenseman Börje Salming for the vast majority of that time. In the next decade, Toronto fell more remote from conflict, completing no higher than third in its division and failing to get past the second round of the playoffs throughout the 1980s. In 1994 the Leafs gained future establishment scoring pioneer Mats Sundin, who drove the group to its first division title in 37 years during the 1999–2000 season; be that as it may, supported playoff achievement kept on escaping the establishment, which never progressed past the gathering finals over Sundin's 13 seasons in Toronto. 

 

Following an establishment record seven-year postseason dry spell, the Maple Leafs came back to the playoffs in 2012–13 just to expand the hopelessness of the group's tormented fan base by losing the choosing seventh round of its opening arrangement in extra time in the wake of driving the Boston Bruins 4–1 halfway through the last time frame. Toronto at that point went into a reconstructing period that brought about a youthful Maple Leafs group startlingly fitting the bill for the playoffs in 2016–17 (a first-round misfortune to the top-seeded Washington Capitals in which five of the six recreations went into additional time), one season after the establishment posted the most noticeably awful record in the NHL. The Maple Leafs turned into a normal postseason installation in the next years yet neglected to progress past the first round of the playoffs during that period. 

 

Regardless of the group's later absence of progress, the Maple Leafs routinely rank at the highest point of the NHL in participation, attributable to the intensity of Toronto hockey fans just as the group's for quite some time built up arrangement of contentions. The bitterest of those fights is with the Montreal Canadiens, which plays on strains among Quebec and Ontario (and those between English-speaking Canadians and French-speaking Canadians) and is considered by numerous individuals to be the best competition in hockey.